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Topic: Malone Autoloader w/ Telos vs Thule Hullavator  (Read 5833 times)

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Yarjammer

  • Salmon
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  • Location: Woodinville, Wa.
  • Date Registered: May 2008
  • Posts: 910
Does anyone have any experience with, or thoughts about, the Malone Autoloader XV with the Telos system or the Thule Hullavator?  I am sick and tired of f'ing up the aft end of my kayak while putting it onto my roof time and again.  Over the winter I picked up bigger tires, leveled out my front end, and I just picked up an entirely new base rack system.  The short of it is, my truck is now a bit taller and could use a different kayak rack system.  Currently I'm using Yakima Mako Aero saddles and Hully Rollers.  I'm leaning towards the Malone system because I could get my canoe on the roof at the same time as my 'yak for family/group camping trips and its a simpler mechanism with less stuff to fail.

Malone Autoloader XV w/ Telos:


Thule Hullavator:


My rig for reference (top of rack is ~7'):


Fishin-T

  • Lingcod
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  • It's called a "Slow Loris"
  • Location: Brothell, Wa
  • Date Registered: Apr 2006
  • Posts: 475
Yar J.,

Nope, no experience with either one.  But I own a Yakima "Boat Loader" that sells for right about $60 and I'm lovin' it.  I use it to load my X-factor (just about as heavy as they get) on top of my 6' tall Isuzu Trooper by myself and I don't have any trouble.  I'd be pretty sure that Thule has a similar product.

Fishin-T
« Last Edit: May 06, 2010, 05:10:41 AM by Fishin-T »
If at first you don't succeed....  maybe skydiving is just not for you.


The Nothing

  • De nihilo nihil
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  • YakFish@IOL
  • Location: NE PDX
  • Date Registered: May 2009
  • Posts: 1124
If you want to take lifting out of the equation, then go with the Hullavator.  If you're looking for just convenience of a lil bit of help, then the Autoloader would make more sense.
~Isaac
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sequim salty

  • Rockfish
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  • Location: sequim, wa
  • Date Registered: Jan 2010
  • Posts: 127
I have both the malone jracks and the malone stinger on my subaru. I ended up going with a trailer because i really struggled with getting the straps on the jrack side of the malone. When the kayak is in the jracks it still has a tendency to want to fall out( I have dropped it so i know) so you are standing on the tire or inside the door trying to hold the kayak in and also trying to thread the straps. On the hullivator i think you can pre strap the kayak which would solve the problem. doug


Yarjammer

  • Salmon
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  • Location: Woodinville, Wa.
  • Date Registered: May 2008
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Thanks for the feedback guys. 

I looked at the Yakima boat loader but it wouldn't fit since my GOBI rack and it would require pretty much the same action, only moved closer to the front of the vehicle than I am already doing.  I don't mind so much the current method aside from the fact it has scuffed a hole in my boat after two season's (ab)use.

I think I like the J-rack concept more, but lifting my Prowler 7ft in the air on its side after a day on the water unguided/unassisted is a recipe for a broken side mirror or worse.  I'm going to Rack-N-Road tomorrow to trade in some of my old racks, maybe they'll let me test out a used J-rack in the parking lot.  At least then I'll have a better idea of what I'm up against.


polepole

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Not bragging ... but I lift my kayaks 7 feet in the air all the time.  It has a lot to do with technique and what I'm lifting it onto.  On my beater SUV with just bars, I can lift Ocean Kayaks onto it with one hand on a side handle and the other on the inside edge of the yak as it's sitting on the ground.  It's a pretty smooth motion from on the ground to pressed above the head.  Raise/lower one edge onto the rack and slide on.  You could use a similar motion for a J rack.

On my other SUV without racks, but with foam cushions, I transport the kayak right side up.  I use a similar motion to raise the kayak overhead with one hand holding a side handle and the other just supporting the middle of the bottom side of the kayak.  This motion is a little more tricky but I can extend this out a bit and set (drop?) it down on the foam saddle no problem.  The foam saddle don't allow me to set down an edge and slide the yak over.

Maybe I should video this?

-Allen
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Lee

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Hey I'd love to see some technique pointers.  Getting my Tarpon on the roof is a hell of a lift.


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Fishin-Jay

  • Perch
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  • Date Registered: Feb 2009
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Hey I'd love to see some technique pointers.  Getting my Tarpon on the roof is a hell of a lift.
Not bragging ... but I lift my kayaks 7 feet in the air all the time.  It has a lot to do with technique and what I'm lifting it onto.  On my beater SUV with just bars, I can lift Ocean Kayaks onto it with one hand on a side handle and the other on the inside edge of the yak as it's sitting on the ground.  It's a pretty smooth motion from on the ground to pressed above the head.  Raise/lower one edge onto the rack and slide on.  You could use a similar motion for a J rack.

On my other SUV without racks, but with foam cushions, I transport the kayak right side up.  I use a similar motion to raise the kayak overhead with one hand holding a side handle and the other just supporting the middle of the bottom side of the kayak.  This motion is a little more tricky but I can extend this out a bit and set (drop?) it down on the foam saddle no problem.  The foam saddle don't allow me to set down an edge and slide the yak over.

Maybe I should video this?

-Allen

I have a P15 and my wife has a T140. I lift both of them up to yakima "J-style" racks on top of my Tacoma's camper shell. The P15 is no problem even after a day in the ocean. The T140 is a major pain in the butt no matter what.

I basically stand next to my truck with the yak on its side between the truck and myself. I grab the yak's carry handle and lift straight up. Then shift my hands down from the handle to the cockpit lip and do a military press up to the racks. It works every time, but the T140 isn't balanced as well as the Prowler, and it's heavier, so I sometimes have to fight it up onto the rack a bit more.

Good luck! I have determined that if I ever upgrade my truck to a full size Tundra, then I'm buying Hullivators!
Formerly of NCKA and missing the days of fishing Bean Hollow!


Hank

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  • Location: San Francisco,CA
  • Date Registered: Feb 2009
  • Posts: 38
I'm savin' my pennies for a Hullavator (I'm an old man and gettin' lazier) but in the meantime I load my Hobie onto my 4Runner like this:

Prop the bow on the open rear door. A piece of pool noodle on the top edge of the door helps it to stay in place.

Lift the stern onto the cargo rack.

Slide the bow onto the rack.

Piece a cake.

The Malone is cheaper but it looks like a PITA.
"Just another Newb"


Yarjammer

  • Salmon
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  • Location: Woodinville, Wa.
  • Date Registered: May 2008
  • Posts: 910
Well, I ended up just buying a used set of Thule Hullaport's on Friday.  I'm not sure how ell its going to work out, but I got a half-decent deal on the at Rack-n-Road while trading-in/selling all of my old rack systems (I kept my saddles and rollers).  I actually got some cash back in my pocket on the whole deal ;D

I'm contemplating suspending a pool noodle from each one while I'm loading just in case to protect my rig... I may to carry a folding step stool around too  ::)

Thanks for the feedback guys.  I appreciate it.


YarrowYakker

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  • Date Registered: Jul 2009
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I bought a Hullavator on Craigslist (still in the box) for half price. I don't think I could continue to handle my X-Factor much longer without it. (I am getting old). It has made all the difference in the world. One thing - the X-Factor is so wide, it doesn't fit down into the Hullavator but rides up off the bottom. Still plenty secure but the first time I loaded it, I thought I must have done something wrong. Turns out - it is just one wide yak.

Summary - I don't know the Malone - but I wouldn't trade my Hullavator. My back thanks me every time I take it out.


Drool

  • Lingcod
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  • Location: E'ville, Wa
  • Date Registered: Sep 2009
  • Posts: 298
Not bragging ... but I lift my kayaks 7 feet in the air all the time.  It has a lot to do with technique and what I'm lifting it onto.  On my beater SUV with just bars, I can lift Ocean Kayaks onto it with one hand on a side handle and the other on the inside edge of the yak as it's sitting on the ground.  It's a pretty smooth motion from on the ground to pressed above the head.  Raise/lower one edge onto the rack and slide on.  You could use a similar motion for a J rack.

On my other SUV without racks, but with foam cushions, I transport the kayak right side up.  I use a similar motion to raise the kayak overhead with one hand holding a side handle and the other just supporting the middle of the bottom side of the kayak.  This motion is a little more tricky but I can extend this out a bit and set (drop?) it down on the foam saddle no problem.  The foam saddle don't allow me to set down an edge and slide the yak over.

Maybe I should video this?

-Allen

Please do.


troutnut

  • Perch
  • ***
  • Date Registered: May 2009
  • Posts: 57
I just lie a piece of carpet across the back edge of my minivan or the Suburban, and put a piece of doormat carpet under the stern, and lift the bow onto the back of the van, go to the stern and slide it up onto the roof racks, with the Suburban I bring a little step ladder for the final few inches.

I rarely can access the side of my vehicle to put a kayak on top, either cars are whooshing by on the highway, or some jackass pulls right next to me in the parking lot.


 

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