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Topic: 3/0, 4/0, 5/0 reels? What does that mean?  (Read 6946 times)

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Fishin-Jay

  • Perch
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  • Location: Hayden, ID
  • Date Registered: Feb 2009
  • Posts: 59
I'm on a quest to figure out what the "#/0" designations mean when discussing reels. You often find the tackle recommendations on resort websites, or long range trips, will recommend a "4/0 reel" or something like it, and I'm trying to figure out what that's all about.

In my searches so far it would seem that the "#/0" designations go back several decades and were often used with certain Penn reels. I'm also seeing the rumor on some forums that there never was a "standard" that says a 4/0 reel has "this set of characteristics" while a 5/0 reel has "that set of characteristics."

So, I'm turning to the expertise on this board to see if anybody can clear this up. If there is no standard for using "#/0" when describing a reel, then what is the generalization they are trying to make when they say 4/0 or 6/0 reel recommended?
 ???

Formerly of NCKA and missing the days of fishing Bean Hollow!


Yarjammer

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I think it refers to the IGFA classes the reel corresponds with or is eligible for...  I tried figuring it out when I bought my first saltwater reel and that is the conclusion I came to. (doesn't mean its right though  ::))


Zee

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Interesting. I've wondered the same myself. Googled and found similar info.

"Next we need to get one piece of terminology straight, the /0 system. When people talk about salt water reel sizes they talk in terms of 1/0, 2/0, 3/0, 4/0, 6/0, 9/0, 10/0, 12/0, 13/0, 14/0, 15/0, 16/0, 18/0 & 20/0 (my personal favorite). The /0 on the end of these terms seems to have been made up for a reason which was shortly thereafter forgotten and has remained shrouded in mystery for many years. It simply meant "OCEAN" or reels built primarily for saltwater use. Did all companies make their reels in all these /0 sizes? No, many companies made only smaller reels and many companies made only larger reels. Only a few companies made reels in most sizes. Were the /0 sizes used as a universal line capacity measurement agreed upon throughout the industry? No, although most companies' reels were quite similar in size it is not uncommon to find companies whose reels of the same /0 size did not have the same dimensions or line capacity. Even within the same companies the /0 size would change over the course of a few years. Not all companies used the /0 system to size their reels."

Z
« Last Edit: February 01, 2011, 03:33:38 PM by Zee »


Fishin-Jay

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Thanks Zee, I found the same site when I was looking around. All this time I assumed everybody else knew what these designations meant and that I was just out of the loop, go figure.  ::)
Formerly of NCKA and missing the days of fishing Bean Hollow!


polepole

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Now the real questions ... what are you going to do with a 4/0 and a 6/0 Jay?   ::)

-Allen
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My Sites:
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Fishin-Jay

  • Perch
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  • Location: Hayden, ID
  • Date Registered: Feb 2009
  • Posts: 59
Unless I win the lotto and buy myself a nice big boat for trolling, I don't ever see myself buying a 6/0 reel. But, I am looking at an East Cape trip in 2012, and I was trying to figure out how much I need to save to pay for the trip and to buy some extra gear. I've got a CalStar GF700M blank in my garage that I plan on building up and pairing with an Avet MX for a 30lb rig on the yak, and I have another rod rated for 30-50 that I plan on pairing with an Avet JX for a 40lb rig for fishing from a Panga or Cruiser. I was trying to figure out how these reels would shake out on the #/0 scale. I think I've figured out that the JX would be considered a 4/0 reel, especially if I spool it with 65lb braid w/a 40lb top shot.

All together I'm hoping to spend 7-10 days on the East Cape in 2012, mostly kayak fishing, but maybe spending some time on a cruiser or panga. I figured on bringing 4 rods:
-8' Shimano Hotshot rated 1-5 oz w/Revo Inshore
-7' Shimano Trevala w/Avet SX 6/4
-7' Calstar w/Avet MX
-7' Accurate w/Avet JX, although the more I think about it, I may not bring such a heavy set up with me since I would never use this from a yak.
« Last Edit: February 02, 2011, 08:38:29 AM by Fishin-Jay »
Formerly of NCKA and missing the days of fishing Bean Hollow!


polepole

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The traditional 4/0 type measurements do not apply to today's smaller reels with higher drags that are used with Spectra.

Your JX is great for a 40# outfit, but how do you compare that to a Penn 113 that is also a 40# outfit?  With the JX, you have to use spectra to get enough line capacity.  The 113 was designed to have the line capacity with mono.

Bring the JX outfit if you like modern technology.  Most pangas will be running 113's or 114's.

-Allen
Sponsored and Supported by:
Ocean Kayak Pro Staff, Kokatat Ambassador
Big Hammer, Humminbird

My Sites:
KayakFishingMagazine.net
NorthWestKayakAnglers.com, NorCalKayakAnglers.com
Aquahunters.com, TheMilkcrateMag.com


 

anything