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Picture Of The Month



Tight lines and fair seas, Pete!

Topic: Self Rescue  (Read 5330 times)

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Idaho Brit

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  • Hobie Tandem Island, Hobie Outback
  • Location: Spokane
  • Date Registered: Jun 2016
  • Posts: 304
Had a great Thursday morning on Lake Coeur dí Alene with ReelMcCoy and Honu for self rescue practice. I strongly recommend getting some of this practice, especially while the water is reasonably warm. We were able to improve some of our weaknesses and techniques. It can be an eye opener as it was for me. Which is the best reason to do this, rather than be complacent about your abilities, only to find out when you need these skills in an emergency, that you are not as skilled or strong as you thought you were. I have a 2015 Hobie Outback with lot of gear, on an already heavy, wide kayak. I had anticipated the difficulty of righting this upturned boat and installed stirrups on each handle to aid in turning the boat back over. This proved to be very effective. Not having practiced this drill on this boat before, I was taken by surprise by the high freeboard. Although I have extensively studied re-entry techniques and understand what is required to get back in the boat. The height of the boat off the water combined with my age and level of fitness proved to be way more problematic than I had anticipated. What I also found out was that I could only re-enter the boat with a buddy assist, doing a ďparallel parkĒ technique. So what I took home from our session was that I need to improve my fitness, loose some weight and develop some mechanical assists to enable effective re-entry. Again I say, ďdonít be complacent or overly confident."  Practice makes perfect. Thank you Reel and Honu for your participation and help.
"Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing -- absolutely nothing -- half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats." Said the water rat.  The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame,


Idaho Brit

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I found out that I,m not good at this, working at it is the most important thing for your safety on the water.
 :o
"Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing -- absolutely nothing -- half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats." Said the water rat.  The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame,


pmmpete

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When getting back into your kayak, fast and simple is better than slow and complicated.  The guys in yellow kayaks in your video have the right idea.  If your kayak gets flipped over, flip it back upright in the direction it came from (so you won't wrap leashes and fishing line around the hull), grab the gunwale with both hands, kick your feet so you're lying horizontally in the water, pull the kayak as far underneath you as you can with one swift motion, and them immediately push yourself further over the kayak so your head is hanging over the opposite gunwale.  Then sit up. Try to be sitting in your kayak within 20 seconds after you get dumped in the water.  Try to avoid spending a lot of time in the water swimming from one side of your kayak to the other and assembling self-rescue gear.

To learn this technique, you could try climbing back into one of your buddy's yellow kayaks, which sit lower in the water than your Outback.

I tried using a self-rescue stirrup, and found it no help at all.  As soon as I put any weight on the stirrup, my legs would go under the kayak, and because I was trying to climb straight up out of the water, I would tend to pull the kayak over on top of myself.  I'm a feeble old fart, but I find the technique described in the first paragraph to be way easier and faster than using a self-rescue stirrup.  When I'm spearfishing for pike in Montana, I get back in my kayak many times a day wearing 13-16 pounds of diving weights on my body and about 3.5 pounds on each ankle.


Idaho Brit

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When getting back into your kayak, fast and simple is better than slow and complicated.  The guys in yellow kayaks in your video have the right idea.  If your kayak gets flipped over, flip it back upright in the direction it came from (so you won't wrap leashes and fishing line around the hull), grab the gunwale with both hands, kick your feet so you're lying horizontally in the water, pull the kayak as far underneath you as you can with one swift motion, and them immediately push yourself further over the kayak so your head is hanging over the opposite gunwale.  Then sit up. Try to be sitting in your kayak within 20 seconds after you get dumped in the water.  Try to avoid spending a lot of time in the water swimming from one side of your kayak to the other and assembling self-rescue gear.

To learn this technique, you could try climbing back into one of your buddy's yellow kayaks, which sit lower in the water than your Outback.

I tried using a self-rescue stirrup, and found it no help at all.  As soon as I put any weight on the stirrup, my legs would go under the kayak, and because I was trying to climb straight up out of the water, I would tend to pull the kayak over on top of myself.  I'm a feeble old fart, but I find the technique described in the first paragraph to be way easier and faster than using a self-rescue stirrup.  When I'm spearfishing for pike in Montana, I get back in my kayak many times a day wearing 13-16 pounds of diving weights on my body and about 3.5 pounds on each ankle.

Ok, good advice. I think though, that I'm way ahead of you in the feeble old fart department. Hahaha. I edited outmy first attempt using the quick and simple method for fear of ridicule, I was very surprised how high the outback is when you see it from water level, the main reason I have the stirrups is to turn it back over more quickly. Due to its width and weight I find it a struggle to right it. My first self rescue practice was last year in my first kayak, a pelican boost 100 and was no problem with the quick and easy method. Just tossed it back over, back over the side and into the seat, no problem. The outback is a different story. My conclusion is more practice and maybe outriggers if the feeble old fart syndrome keeps kicking in. Bahaha. My main point is to encourage people to practice self rescue cos you my not be quite so good at it as you think. Like me. Oh and loosing some weight and getting more exercise might help me too. Again, thanks for the good advise.
"Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing -- absolutely nothing -- half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats." Said the water rat.  The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame,


Trident 13

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Depending on your gear setup, getting back in the middle is not always the easiest/quickest.  Coming over the front allows you to use bulkhead cover straps to pull the kayak under you with the length of the kayak serving as a counterweight.  Once in it may be hard to get around fish finders etc., but you're working on that problem while out of the water.  Stay low and crawl to the middle.  Works ok in waves as well by pointing the away end into the wind.


Idaho Brit

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Yes, thats a good idea, I'm working on a way to clear my foredeck of obstructions either permanent or during re boarding. I've got to work on that. I have a camera, rod holder and fish finder in the way. Even If I clear one side it might be more doable. Got to work on this. My wife will kill me if I drowned in the lake. Thanks.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2016, 05:45:18 PM by Idaho Brit »
"Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing -- absolutely nothing -- half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats." Said the water rat.  The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame,


hdpwipmonkey

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Thats why I keep the right side of my outback clear.  I also have to use a self rescue assist device for my Outback.  In my Ocean Kayak its no problem but the side of the Outback is so high when in the water.  When using the stirrup you have to do it at an angle otherwise you'll just pull the kayak over on yourself.  It takes practice but once you figure it out you'll be popping right in first time.

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Ray
2020 Hobie Outback "Chum Chicken"
2015 Hobie Outback "Chum Chucker"
Wilderness Tarpon 100






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2016 Junk Jig Challenge
Category - ITíS NOT A DRINKING PROBLEM IF YOUíRE BEING CREATIVE
1st place - The Drunken Bastard


pmmpete

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When using the stirrup you have to do it at an angle otherwise you'll just pull the kayak over on yourself.  It takes practice but once you figure it out you'll be popping right in first time.
Post a video which shows how to do it! I haven't had any success in my limited experimenting with a stirrup.


hdpwipmonkey

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When using the stirrup you have to do it at an angle otherwise you'll just pull the kayak over on yourself.  It takes practice but once you figure it out you'll be popping right in first time.
Post a video which shows how to do it! I haven't had any success in my limited experimenting with a stirrup.
Next time I'm out I'll put something together.  In the mean time checkout the videos for the waterbug self rescue step.  That's where I started at.

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Ray
2020 Hobie Outback "Chum Chicken"
2015 Hobie Outback "Chum Chucker"
Wilderness Tarpon 100






www.facebook.com/HOWNOC


2016 Junk Jig Challenge
Category - ITíS NOT A DRINKING PROBLEM IF YOUíRE BEING CREATIVE
1st place - The Drunken Bastard


Idaho Brit

  • Lingcod
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  • Location: Spokane
  • Date Registered: Jun 2016
  • Posts: 304
When using the stirrup you have to do it at an angle otherwise you'll just pull the kayak over on yourself.  It takes practice but once you figure it out you'll be popping right in first time.
Post a video which shows how to do it! I haven't had any success in my limited experimenting with a stirrup.

Here is an option Im going to try. I already have the paddle float, just need the strapping.
"Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing -- absolutely nothing -- half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats." Said the water rat.  The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame,


tote

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Let me qualify myself before making any comments.
I have over 10K posts on NCKA, been an active member since 2005, so please don't let my post count here (or lack of) shadow my comment.

I am extremely passionate about what we called back in the day 'getting back on your kayak'. The term now is 'self rescue'.
And that's what it should be SELF rescue. Unless you've suffered an injury you should be able to get back onto your kayak w/o assistance.

First and foremost...get back on the kayak!
Whatever gear you have is 100% replaceable..you are not.
I've seen more guys become hypothermic because they wasted way too much time in the water.
Gather your stuff once you are comfortably aboard.

Getting back on the kayak is just as easy as getting out of a built-in pool. The principle is the same.
Both hands on the side, kick as you lift yourself aboard. As you do this, pull your hands towards your hips. This will slide the kayak underneath you.
Lay flat on your belly.
Roll onto your back.
Sit up.
Put your feet forward.

If you are new to this, practice with a bare kayak. Once you get it down pat, add whatever gear you would normally take with you.
My preferred method of righting my kayak is to reach under to the other side, pull it down as I push up on the side closest to me. Easy peasy and no struggling involved at all.
I also practice righting the kayak from the bow and stern. You never know where you will end up or how much time you have to get back on and get moving.
I recommend  practicing getting on your kayak while it is upside down and walking from bow to stern as well.
I put my kids through the grinder on these drills so when (not if) they unexpectedly go for a swim tacking care of business isn't even a second thought.
Below are a couple of pics practicing what I preach at Lake Tahoe...not exactly warm water.  ;)


hdpwipmonkey

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@ Brit, I think that's a lot of different parts to try and assemble while bobbing around in the water.  That's why I like the stirrup.  Its already attached to my boat and either under my seat or in the side pocket.  I just right the kayak, pull out the stirrup and I'm aboard.  Its not pretty and fluid like some others that are in better shape then my self but I get aboard pretty quick.

@tote, I still practice trying to board my boat without the stirrup and I am getting better at it but I can still do it quicker with the stirrup.  Maybe once I lose another 50 lbs and build up some better upper body strength I'll be able to go it with out the stirrup but until then my stirrup will always be attached to the right side grab handle of my Outback but I'm not giving up on trying to master it.  I can do it easily on my other kayak but it sits lower in the water than the Outback.  BTW, that's some crazy balance skills but I don't understand what walking around on the underside of kayak helps with besides showing what balance skills you have.

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« Last Edit: August 10, 2016, 09:09:03 PM by hdpwipmonkey »
Ray
2020 Hobie Outback "Chum Chicken"
2015 Hobie Outback "Chum Chucker"
Wilderness Tarpon 100






www.facebook.com/HOWNOC


2016 Junk Jig Challenge
Category - ITíS NOT A DRINKING PROBLEM IF YOUíRE BEING CREATIVE
1st place - The Drunken Bastard


reelmccoy

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When using the stirrup you have to do it at an angle otherwise you'll just pull the kayak over on yourself.  It takes practice but once you figure it out you'll be popping right in first time.
Post a video which shows how to do it! I haven't had any success in my limited experimenting with a stirrup.

Here is an option Im going to try. I already have the paddle float, just need the strapping.


This looks like it would work for you Tony.  The strap hanging off the paddle allows you to get your feet under you and the paddle float gives the boat stability.  Let's try it!


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tote

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@ Brit, I think that's a lot of different parts to try and assemble while bobbing around in the water.  That's why I like the stirrup.  Its already attached to my boat and either under my seat or in the side pocket.  I just right the kayak, pull out the stirrup and I'm aboard.  Its not pretty and fluid like some others that are in better shape then my self but I get aboard pretty quick.

@tote, I still practice trying to board my boat without the stirrup and I am getting better at it but I can still do it quicker with the stirrup.  Maybe once I lose another 50 lbs and build up some better upper body strength I'll be able to go it with out the stirrup but until then my stirrup will always be attached to the right side grab handle of my Outback but I'm not giving up on trying to master it.  I can do it easily on my other kayak but it sits lower in the water than the Outback.  BTW, that's some crazy balance skills but I don't understand what walking around on the underside of kayak helps with besides showing what balance skills you have.

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Because I want to be Helen Freaking Keller when I go in the drink. The more $#!t you put yourself through the less $#!T you'll be dealing with when the real $#!T hits the fan.
What if, for whatever reason, your kayak got a hole in the bottom?
Maybe I might have to flip it over to keep it from sinking. Then maybe I might have to stand up on it to flag someone down.
I taught martial arts for 25 years.
We used to train in all kinds of crazy stuff.
Do I ever think I'll get in a fight in a spring creek under a waterfall in freezing water...hell no. Did I train for it...yep.
And why not? If you are going to practice something, max it out. It's only going to make you better.


Idaho Brit

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@ Brit, I think that's a lot of different parts to try and assemble while bobbing around in the water.  That's why I like the stirrup.  Its already attached to my boat and either under my seat or in the side pocket.  I just right the kayak, pull out the stirrup and I'm aboard.  Its not pretty and fluid like some others that are in better shape then my self but I get aboard pretty quick.

@tote, I still practice trying to board my boat without the stirrup and I am getting better at it but I can still do it quicker with the stirrup.  Maybe once I lose another 50 lbs and build up some better upper body strength I'll be able to go it with out the stirrup but until then my stirrup will always be attached to the right side grab handle of my Outback but I'm not giving up on trying to master it.  I can do it easily on my other kayak but it sits lower in the water than the Outback.  BTW, that's some crazy balance skills but I don't understand what walking around on the underside of kayak helps with besides showing what balance skills you have.

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Because I want to be Helen Freaking Keller when I go in the drink. The more $#!t you put yourself through the less $#!T you'll be dealing with when the real $#!T hits the fan.
What if, for whatever reason, your kayak got a hole in the bottom?
Maybe I might have to flip it over to keep it from sinking. Then maybe I might have to stand up on it to flag someone down.
I taught martial arts for 25 years.
We used to train in all kinds of crazy stuff.
Do I ever think I'll get in a fight in a spring creek under a waterfall in freezing water...hell no. Did I train for it...yep.
And why not? If you are going to practice something, max it out. It's only going to make you better.


Tote, thanks for your input. While I donít disagree with anything you said, at my age Iím never going to be able to master the keel walking example. Especially when sometimes I have trouble getting up off the sofa. Having said that, this is a work in progress for me. The main reason I even posted this, putting myself out there for ridicule. Was to stimulate discussion about a skill that I strongly feel is vitally important. Also to prevent complacency about ones ability to get back on your kayak. What works for some may not work for others, for their own personal reasons. So Iím keeping on working out what works for me, in a controlled and assisted environment. My other options are to get outriggers or quit kayaking.
Thanks again for your input and passion.
"Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing -- absolutely nothing -- half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats." Said the water rat.  The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame,


 

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